Champagne Glasses
Feb 21, 2017
Amanda O'Donovan
0
307

DRIVEN TO DRINK

If recent world events have you reaching for the bottle, teeter over to bbc.com and marvel at the astonishing revelation that there are 3,000 alcohol-related words in the English language. Although English speakers often act like we invented the word booze, lexicographer Susie Dent is quick to correct. It was, in fact, the Dutch who coined the verb buizen, more than 500 years ago, in an effort to describe what it’s like to get clog faced. Susie also uncovers the origins of the word ‘lush’. Using the long-form, and more historically correct, ‘Lushington’ somehow takes the edge off what could otherwise sound like a low blow.

Susie Dent’s article about boozing was published on January 31, 2017. Read it in full here: English has 3,000 words for being drunk.  The article also reveals that the only subjects to attract more slang are sex and money!

 The Canadian Drinking Dictionary

The article got me thinking about how we all make language our own, whatever the subject. How we dress up favourite phrases, localize them, create a community around them and watch as they become chill. While many Brits demonstrate staggering proficiency when it comes to drinking vocabulary, Canadians are no laggards. After all, our first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, was a bit of a Lushington! On the subject of drinking, the country that adopted me is a master of self-expression.

Some of the terms you see below were alien to me when I was fresh off the plane so, for the benefit of the uninitiated, here’s a little lexicon:

Caesar

The Canadian version of a Bloody Mary…made with clamato juice.

 

Two-Four

A case of 24 beers.

May Two-Four Weekend

A celebration of Queen Victoria’s birthday, often toasted with two-fours.

 

Tall Boy

A can of beer that contains 473 ml, or 24 oz. in the US.

 

King Can

A supersized beer, containing up to 950 ml.

 

Mickey

A 375 ml bottle of liquor. Unlike a US mickey, which is a date- rape drug!

 

Twenty-Sixer (Twixer)

A 750 ml bottle of liquor, measured in the US as 26 oz.

Forty-Pounder

Just over a litre of liquor.

 

Sixty-Pounder

1.75 l of liquor (66 oz.).

 

Texas Mickey

Three litres of alcohol.

 

Kegger

Beloved by high school and college students. Beer is served from a keg, often accompanied by beer funnels and beer pong.

 

Pre-Drinking

Also known as pre-loading or, in the States, pre-gaming. Usually refers to students who gather to consume cheap alcohol before going to an event or location where alcohol prices are high.

 

Day Drunk

Often accidental, when a glass at lunchtime gets out of hand.

 

Boozy Brunch

The new lunch…adored by millennials and often accompanied by mimosas and caesars.

 

Molson Muscle

Beer belly.


Been Too Free with Sir John Strawberry?

That’s about it from me. I’m off to the lush crib, aka the pub. It’s a description that’s as old as the hills but somehow sounds very 2017. While I’m enjoying a tipple, take a look at some of the many ways that people around the world describe intoxication:

 

Annihilated

 

Legless

 

Plastered

 

Soused

 

Too Free with Sir John Strawberry

 

Like an Owl in an Ivy Bush

 

Pickled

 

Sozzled

 

Bladdered

 

Liquored up

 

Pissed as a Newt  or Fart Squiffy

 

Blitzed

 

Lit Like a Christmas Tree

 

Pleasantly Jingled

 

 

Tanked

 

Bombed

 

Loaded Rat Arsed

 

Tied One On

 

Brahms and Liszt

 

Marinated

 

Roostered

 

Tight as Andronicus

 

Canned

 

Nappied

 

Sauced

 

Three Sheets to the Wind

 

Drunk as a Badger, Skunk, Thrush or Lord

 

Nonced Schloggered

 

Trashed

 

Half Cut

 

Obliterated

 

Shit Faced

 

Wazzocked

 

Hooched Up

 

Off Ya Face

 

Slammed

 

Well Oiled

 

Hammered

 

Out of His tree

 

Sloshed

 

Wrecked

 

Horizontal

 

Out of One’s Gourd

 

Smashed

 

Zipped
In One’s Cups

 

Paralytic

 

Smurfed

 

Zonked

For many more drunken expressions see Beer Fest Boots, urban dictionary and Buzzfeed’s 2,321 Words for Drunk, Ranked

Amanda O’Donovan is a Senior Content Writer + Communications Specialist, based in Toronto. You can contact her at 416.456.3859, info@amandaodonovan.com or through LinkedIn